Should Pets be Restrained in the Car?

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Should we restrain our pets when travelling in the car?

Of course, we should, it’s really just like travelling with a child in the car, and you wouldn’t leave them loose in the car would you?

The highway code states that “When in a vehicle, make sure dogs or other animals are suitably restrained so they cannot distract or injury you, or themselves, if you stop quickly. 

A seat belt harness, pet carrier, cage or guard are ways of restraining animals in cars.” 

This advice goes for all animals, so small pets and birds must also be restrained.

 The highway code itself doesn’t carry a penalty for not restraining animals, however, you could still be stopped by the Police for driving without due care and attention or for carrying an unsafe load.  If your pet caused the collision, you may be charged with dangerous driving. 

Pets can be very distracting when driving, even when properly restrained (there’s nothing quite as trying as the consistent yowling coming from the cat in the carrier) imagine if your pet could clamber into the front seats to be close to you – it’s not only very distracting but they could also cause a collision. 

So, how can you restrain your pet? 

There are a number of products on the market, and for small mammals and cats, a suitably sized cat carrier will be sufficient.  Remember to secure it in the car if possible, some small mammal carriers have hooks built in for the seat belt.

For dogs, a crate is the best option secured in the boot. It needs to be spacious enough for your dog to move around and they need to be used to being in one.

A seat belt harness is an option.  The harness fits snugly around your dog, then clips into the seat belt buckle – this helps to keep your dog safer if you have a crash, and you don’t have a Labrador that now weighs the same as a rhinoceros hitting you in the back of the head!  But remember is they are sitting on the front passenger seat to turn off the airbag and push the seat back.

You can also get dog guards for the boot of your car, these prevent your pet getting into the main cab of the car, however it doesn’t provide any protection for them if you had a crash.  Our advice would be to combine this with the use of a crate.

Remember, transporting a pet is very like transporting a child:

  • Make sure they are correctly restrained
  • Don’t have the windows fully open
  • Don’t leave in a hot car unattended
  • Have plenty breaks on your journey

Pet restraints do not legally go through crash testing, however there are crash tested products available.

Source:

https://www.highwaycodeuk.co.uk/answers/can-you-drive-with-your-dog-in-the-car#

https://www.vets4pets.com/pet-health-advice/dog-advice/safe-car-travel-for-dogs/

https://www.petsathome.com/shop/en/pets/dog

BACK TO BLOG

Should Pets be Restrained in the Car?

Should we restrain our pets when travelling in the car?

Of course, we should, it’s really just like travelling with a child in the car, and you wouldn’t leave them loose in the car would you?

The highway code states that “When in a vehicle, make sure dogs or other animals are suitably restrained so they cannot distract or injury you, or themselves, if you stop quickly. 

A seat belt harness, pet carrier, cage or guard are ways of restraining animals in cars.” 

This advice goes for all animals, so small pets and birds must also be restrained.

 The highway code itself doesn’t carry a penalty for not restraining animals, however, you could still be stopped by the Police for driving without due care and attention or for carrying an unsafe load.  If your pet caused the collision, you may be charged with dangerous driving. 

Pets can be very distracting when driving, even when properly restrained (there’s nothing quite as trying as the consistent yowling coming from the cat in the carrier) imagine if your pet could clamber into the front seats to be close to you – it’s not only very distracting but they could also cause a collision. 

So, how can you restrain your pet? 

There are a number of products on the market, and for small mammals and cats, a suitably sized cat carrier will be sufficient.  Remember to secure it in the car if possible, some small mammal carriers have hooks built in for the seat belt.

For dogs, a crate is the best option secured in the boot. It needs to be spacious enough for your dog to move around and they need to be used to being in one.

A seat belt harness is an option.  The harness fits snugly around your dog, then clips into the seat belt buckle – this helps to keep your dog safer if you have a crash, and you don’t have a Labrador that now weighs the same as a rhinoceros hitting you in the back of the head!  But remember is they are sitting on the front passenger seat to turn off the airbag and push the seat back.

You can also get dog guards for the boot of your car, these prevent your pet getting into the main cab of the car, however it doesn’t provide any protection for them if you had a crash.  Our advice would be to combine this with the use of a crate.

Remember, transporting a pet is very like transporting a child:

  • Make sure they are correctly restrained
  • Don’t have the windows fully open
  • Don’t leave in a hot car unattended
  • Have plenty breaks on your journey

Pet restraints do not legally go through crash testing, however there are crash tested products available.

Source:

https://www.highwaycodeuk.co.uk/answers/can-you-drive-with-your-dog-in-the-car#

https://www.vets4pets.com/pet-health-advice/dog-advice/safe-car-travel-for-dogs/

https://www.petsathome.com/shop/en/pets/dog

BACK TO BLOG